The debt-free system: Part 4: Even the good has its day (A tale of effectively eliminating good debt…forever!)

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The debt-free system: Part 4: Even the good has its day

(A tale of effectively eliminating good debt…forever!)

‘People are living longer than ever before, a phenomenon undoubtedly made necessary by the 35-year mortgage’, Doug Larson.

So the good news is that if you’ve joined me in your journey against debt on part 4 of the debt-free system then the gruelling work is done, your financial feather should now be gliding in the breeze, as light as the air itself, seemingly unaffected by the laws of gravity (debt) whose main concern is to drag us all down to earth.

The bad news however is that the hard work is not over, now is not the time to begin feasting again on the tasty cake of consumerism. You’ll know from previous experience where that temptation leads you to. There are no presents to celebrate, no new car, no lavish holiday abroad and no 50” LED TV, they’ll all have to wait because what we’ve done up to now is to focus on building the most solid financial foundations you could ever wish for. Now is the time to start finishing the job off and to secure your financial future…for life.

Up to now the financial focus of the debt-free system has been on reducing non-essential expenditure through changing spending habits and mindsets. The consequence of this was to lighten the load, to create a positive monthly cash-flow to enable and to increase the speed at which you can eliminate consumer debt. This would leave us with two final financial goals to achieve; to reduce ‘good’ debt in a time span which allows enough money for you (and your family) to live flourishing lives and to also plan for later in life.

A recent trick of the mortgage industry is the 35 year mortgage. In years gone by 25 years was the norm but in an effort to make mortgages more ‘affordable’ banks considered it a good idea to thin out those debt repayments over an additional ten years. Not only does this artificially affect the general rules for supply and demand in the housing market, stoking up house prices even further, it’s also a very profitable idea for the mortgage providers as well. Check it out for yourself on the mortgage calculator link below and you’ll discover that on an average £200,000 mortgage those extra 10 years will also cost you a staggering £55,000 more in additional interest charges, a 50% profit increase for banks!!! That £55,000 has to come from somewhere though and unfortunately, as is always the case, it’s directly from the Bank of You. Maybe it’s time that bank products started coming with cigarette style warnings. ‘This product will seriously damage your financial health!’, as these debt vehicles, with prolonged periods of debt repayments, and the interest which is accrued along the way, is a financial disease which is unwittingly affecting millions of homeowners.

With this you may think the debt-free minimalist approach might be to go hell for leather and wipe out your mortgage completely within 10-15 years but here, once again, the slow approach is recommended again, the aim being simply to clear your mortgage in a 25-year mortgage span, with a view of leaving a good 5-10 years of your working financial life completely free of all forms of debt, which, oddly, is quite likely to be the first time that you are in the whole of your adult life…a scary proposition don’t you think? To ensure you can afford the additional payments, which are the difference between a 25 and 35 year mortgage term, the cost should be met by the surplus income made by having reduced unnecessary monthly expenses and from eliminating the costs associated with having to service consumer debts, it should not be made affordable by having to forgo even simple human pleasures or working even longer hours at the cost of precious family/leisure time.

Beware the honey pot trap. Often spurred on by rampant house inflation, it is all too easy to be lured in to reborrowing against the value of your home to pay for big stuff such as a home improvement or a new car. However it is vital that you ignore the lure of this particular honey as inside this hive is one almighty sting. A financial tool with which to boost a flagging economy, recent governments like nothing better than making consumers feel ‘rich’ by inflating the value of their homes, by devaluing currency and inflating prices, as they know, all too well, that one of the consequences of increased house prices is increased consumer borrowing, and subsequent consumer spending, against the capital ‘stored’ in their homes.

The problem with using your house value as one big, mammoth overdraft with which to purchase lifestyle improvements is that, just like the smaller overdraft with your bank, it’s not your money and one day, if not soon, you’ll be paying it back to your bank with staggering amounts of compound interest (for more on this check out my previous article ‘A tale of opportunity cost…’. A close friend of mine is a victim of this exact behaviour, having been one of the lucky ones to have bought a property at the beginning of the millenium, opposed to anyone buying in the second half of the noughties, from good timing he has benefited financially (from rising house values) to the tune of tens of thousands of pounds, a benefit which if not frivolously wasted would have meant he was at least halfway through paying off his mortgage and set-up for a very rosy financial future. Unfortunately this is not the case for him and his family, for the capital in his home has been used to fund a lifestyle which costs in far excess of their natural income.

As with most rules there is an exception to the rule. Using value in your home to expand your current home, as an alternative to moving home, makes perfect debt-free minimalism sense. Moving home is a costly business, and if the move is only for a relatively small improvement in living space, then borrowing to expand your current home is usually the most cost-effective way of doing it. Switching homes will cost the average homeowner around £5,000 in estate agent fees, Stamp duty, conveyancing, removal and other associated costs. So before you move house why not consider the alternative and save yourself in the process a lot of time, money and stress!

There is a well-known saying that the rich get richer whilst the poor get poorer and this saying definitely applies to those who have equity in their home. Having 90% LTV (percentage of loan compared to the value of your house) on a £200,000 house will mean your debt is charged interest equivalent to £6,000 per £150,000 of debt, each year (£500 interest p.m), reducing your LTV to 75% LTV brings a dramatic reduction to just £4,300 per interest. As you can see from these figures, that’s £1,700 less interest on your debt if you maintain a high LTV, think of the lifestyle improvements that can fund, and as opposed to increasing borrowing against your debt, this method is also long-term sustainable….you’ve just got to get that high LTV point first! For a bit of increased motivation with this check out my article ‘It’s all about marshmellows…. a tale about deferred gratification’.

Whilst for some a 25 year mortgage span may appear on the tame side and a 20 year mortgage a much more headlining grabbing figure, I feel that to do this, on an average salary, an imbalance in your financial life is often created and the area in which this usually occurs is in financial plans for later in life….retirement. Have no disillusions if you’re not one of the lucky few who still have a final salary scheme pension plan then retirement is one hell of a costly idea and you’d better start thinking about it sooner rather than later because it’s not going to get any cheaper!

On the positive side, having embraced a life of debt-free minimalism, it highly likely you’ll be in the win-win position of having created a lifestyle which is both financially stable and long term sustainable. Add to that living without the strains of consumer debt, it is possible that you will have the money surplus each month from which to start making plans for a life in retirement, which with the fortunes of both good health and good luck, could easily last as long as your working life .  

The debt-free minimalist approach: There’s no doubt that your home is your biggest financial asset in your life so the way you pay for it will have a significant effect on your financial future. Your mortgage should be structured so that you can afford to pay it off in at least 25 years whilst also allowing you, and your family, the necessary disposable income for you and your family to live flourishing lives and also surplus income with which to build a solid, retirement strategy. Just as in many other steps along this debt-free journey there will be temptations all-around, all of which will be attempting to deviate you from the route of simplicity and happiness, so keep your guard up and remain focused because if you get this right then you’ll be completely debt-free and set-up financially for life!

P.S. Don’t forget to organise the ‘I’ve paid off my mortgage party’ and remember to send me an invite.

http://www.moneysupermarket.com/mortgages/calculator/

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