The debt-free system: Part 5: Making plans for old-age… when you’re far from it! (A tale of the haves and the have nots)

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‘The question isn’t at what age I want to retire, it’s at what income.’ 
— George Forman

The debt-free system: Part 5: Making plans for old-age… when you’re far from it!

(A tale of the haves and the have nots)

For those of you who are thinking ‘what happened to Part 4 of the debt-free system?’ don’t worry, you haven’t missed a thing! Just like the film industry, it’s o.k to have the sequel before the prequel…just think Superman/Star Wars etc.. As I wrote both Part 4 and Part 5, simultaneously, it struck me that I couldn’t possibly emphasise how important retirement planning is, especially in the middle of your life when much of your financial focus will be on mortgage debt (and quite possibly consumer debt), without writing about it, at considerable length, first. So that’s what I’ve done, and this article will do its best to explain why.

How much income you will need in retirement is obviously a subjective question, an answer which varies from person to person. I personally would like to imagine that in retirement I would be able to maintain the same standard of living, or even slightly higher, as I currently enjoy…but without the current long, exhausting hours slogging away at work! The good news is that the current government (U.K.) currently give a generous helping hand with this via an annual state pension income of £7,488, although who’s to say what the government will be able to provide in a further 30 years? If I’d were you I’d make sure you’ve got a Plan B because the murky world of finance and government has a tendency to implode on itself every so often and it’s usually us, the citizen, which has to pay for it in some way.

So how much will I need? Now the time to dust off that high school scientific calculator (don’t worry we won’t be using the scientific part!), or just grab yourself a pen and your finest arithmetic skills, and make sure you can access, or accurately guess, your annual incomes/outgoings. First you’ll need to add up your net annual household income, take away the annual of servicing your mortgage and also be able to guesstimate the cost for each dependent in your child (the cost of this will vary greatly from family to family…..think costs of education (fees) age (nappies), hobbies (sailing) etc..). Once you have this divide the sum by two (if you live as a couple) and take away the state pension amount (£7,488). My own figures looks like this; £31,000 (joint net income) – £8,500 (mortgage costs) – £1,500 (child associated costs) = £21,000 divided by two = £10,500 – £7,488 (state pension income) = £3,012.

As you can see from the figures above, retirement for a debt-free minimalist (dfm) is not a frightening prospect. Having learnt to live a simple life in which personal happiness and flourishing does not correlate with increasing amounts of expenditure, the dfm system creates a viable business plan, not just for your working life but way beyond it as well. For others though, the figures may not be so comforting! To create just £8,000 of income in retirement, you will need an astonishing £200,000 pension pot! For a 35 year old starting their retirement planning now, that would require you to begin making a monthly pension contribution of £350, for a couple that would be a seriously deep, £700, black hole in your monthly expenses column. However, if you can begin thinking of life when you’ll be old and grey whilst you’re still in the very prime of your life, at 25 years of age, that figure comes down to a more manageable, but still sizeable, £250 p.m.

Personally I’m not a fan of personal pensions. I’m all too aware of the financial middlemen taking away, more than their fair share, of your contributions/investment along each step of the way and also whilst we all hope to live long into retirement, the risk of this happening, in my opinion, is not outweighed by favourable returns on annuities (the product that you buy in retirement to give you an annual income through it). In the U.K. you do benefit from tax relief on your monthly contributions but as it currently stands later on down the line when you’re receiving your pension income you’ll be paying income tax on all but the first £2,000 of any additional (on top of the state) pension income. The dfm suggests the alternative pension, the alternative whose capital sum won’t die with you, will always produce a reasonable income…even when you’ve long gone and is most people’s greatest hope of ever creating generational wealth. If you haven’t worked it out already then I will share it with you now….it’s a second home.

A second home for many is an asset only suitable for the well-off or the rich, but this is not strictly true and by following the dfm approach to retirement planning it could be one of the best financial decisions you’ll ever make. In Stage 4 of the Debt-free system I recommend a 25 year mortgage timespan, not that 20 years is financially out of reach, but for the reason that the system is designed to ensure you have the available income to create solid plans for retirement. And whether you invest in a personal pension or take the alternative in buying a house you’ll need every penny to make it work.

Just as in the article, ‘It’s all about marshmellows’ and any other articles I have written on this site, buying a second home will take time, patience, willpower and long-term vision but the future payback this time is monumental and, for future generations of your family, life changing. It certainly won’t happen overnight but what truly successful approaches to creating real wealth actually do?

Your first step in this journey is to save a lump sum which will be used to put a deposit down on a home. Currently a buy-to-let mortgage requires a 25% lump sum, a sizeable sum but it can be done. On a home costing the national average, £167,000, this would mean a deposit of an eye-watering £41,750. At this point you might want to run to the nearest personal pension provider and sign on the dotted line but stay with me. As it’s possible that rising prices will require this amount to be a little larger I have calculated, prudently I have to say, figures on saving a deposit of £50,000 (20% higher). For the 25 year old setting aside £250 p.m that would take 13 years of contributions, for the 35 year beginning planning for retirement late that would take a 9.5 year wait. Not meaning to wish away time but this would leave the 25 year old still only 38 years young and the 35 year old late-comers, still revelling in their mid-forties.

Deposit saved, and avoiding all temptations to blow it on a ‘once in a lifetime’ trip abroad or your mid-life crisis sportscar, you will now have the money to buy a suitable house for rental. As it stands your money will purchase a house capable of producing an income of £800 p.m, against a monthly repayment mortgage cost of only £650, for 20 years. The surplus £150 income, for all other intentions of purpose should be ignored and kept aside to deal with future costs associated with owning this property. You may have recognised that you will still have your monthly pension contribution amount to invest elsewhere, we’ll come back to that later.

Fast forward a further 20 years, and with no further funding, not only will you be the outright owner of a second home, with your buy-to-let mortgage completely paid off, you’ll also have created an income stream of £9,600 per annum. This income, whilst open to the variances of the rental market, will be paid to you not only throughout the rest of your life, but potentially, being held in trust, throughout every generation of your family there after. Not only that, in the form of your second home there’s a very attractive capital-rich asset that could be re-mortgaged or even sold should the family ever desperately need an immediate large sum of money. If, as a couple, you both follow this route then this future generational wealth is simply doubled, tap it into your calculator the money amounts are simply staggering!

Leaving assets to your children/grandchildren when you have left this earth is all well and good but speaking from experience it is highly likely that they may require, and appreciate, your financial aid long before you’re on your work to becoming part of the churchyard’s compost. This is the point at which you redirect the money previously designated pension contributions, to a pot called family support. I know first-hand how important financial support is from relatives, without it the big moments up to now in my life would have either been delayed or missed out on completely. It was with support from my wife’s dying grandparents that we were not only able to buy our first home, in which my family still live, but also pay for our wedding, which whilst planned with a budget, still cost far more than we could have ever of afforded alone.

The figures stack up quite impressively too, your £250 per month , not needed now for retirement planning, over the remaining 7 years of your working life (after paying off your second home mortgage and assuming the dfm retirement age of 65), earning a realistic 4% interest, would amount to just over £24,000. Unfortunately for the late retirement planners there isn’t the time between paying off your second home and retirement to begin creating this nest-egg although I’m not one moment thinking that there won’t be other money, either in the form of yourself receiving some inheritance or potentially higher-than-expect income, from which to create a pass-me-down fund.

The debt-free minimalist approach: So there it is, a complete financial plan, all the way from the prime of your life to the days you’ll be pushing up the daisies, all in five simple stages. The two objectives of this final article is to make you, the reader, ponder A: Have I truly considered the cost of retiring? and B: Are there are other options to the traditional pension? I think you’ll agree that yes retirement can be expensive but only if you leave it to the last minute, the earlier you begin to plan for it then the cheaper it will become. Along the way you’ll encounter the types who’ll claim they simply can’t afford to put away, but behind the excuses I guarantee they will be the all too familiar tales of consumer debt, overspending and excess! Don’t be part of the over 50% of the U.K/U.S population who have either none or too little in their retirement plans, because I guarantee that the day you retire and put your feet up, there will be a lot of people admiring what you have achieved, all whilst they serve up cold dog food for dinner, wishing they hadn’t blown all which they had earned on iPhones, designer clothes, cable t.v, holidays in the sun and a shit load of other stuff which they really didn’t need! Live simply, live happily, live long.

 

http://www.yourwealth.co.uk/pensions/pension-calculator

 

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